Category Archives: Rainwater

Rainwater Harvesting

More on Rainwater Harvesting soon but in the meantime, have a look at “RAINWATER HARVESTING from Freerain rainwater recycling.”

http://www.freerain.co.uk/

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Rainwater Harvesting

Sat, 23 Jul 2005, 17:34 – Grant (World of Water) REPLY to John Jones

Hi John

Glad to know the Site was of interest and there are many links on Rainwater Harvesting. I feel everyone should be harvesting the rain, sun, wind, gravitational pull of the moon (via the tides) and gravity (via the potential in hydro-electric).

Harnessing powers that are “there” and would be LOST if not harnessed is a better route than exploiting the ‘potentials’ locked within ore, crude oil, aquifers, woodlands, peat .

Did I hear that the UK Government is investing £800million in Nuclear Fusion (NOT Fission). If this is the case then “Watch this Space”. The World has always awaited a way of producing power without needless waste products and associated problems. “Fusion” is viewed my many with horror but personally, I view the concept as very interesting and a “Must-explore” area.

Mind you, I also view genetic engineering as a “Must-explore” area …. but the place to explore these kind of things is in the Laboratory and not in the middle of naturally occurring stable gene crops )If anything in Nature can be viewed as really “stable”

All best.

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Grant
World of Water
World Clean Water Campaigner

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Sat, 23 Jul 2005, 11:55 – John C. Jones TO GRANT

Hello again Grant.

Thank you once more for some useful information. I found the website which you mentioned most interesting. I can recommend it to everyone who is interested in this question.

http://www.rainwaterharvesting.org

Best Wishes.

The one and only J.
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Wed, 13 Jul 2005, 12:02 – John C. Jones REPLY TO Grant (World of Water)

Good morning Grant.

Thank you for the reply and the useful information. I did actually have in mind the idea that some local naturally-occurring materials might be used to make the water-collection apparatus. As you have suggested, the roof of every house provides the ideal equipment, as it will always be “automatically” made from waterproof materials in any suitable area. I could probably develop the idea of designing the roofs of houses to focus particularly on the collection of water, incorporating the necessary apparatus as a general rule.

“Each site is unique” are the type of words I like to read. This is how every situation is best viewed. It enables us to remain flexible and approach the question without any rigid preconceived ideas on how it will be answered. Large organisations and projects do not have this facility.

On the question of storage-tanks, you say that “People must use what they have to hand in their locality.” I do always encourage this idea in all types of work. I think that wood might be the only suitable local material and barrels might be the items produced. It might be necessary to launch a new industry for the cultivation of trees for the manufacture of barrels. Any further ideas on this aspect will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for the web address for rainwater-harvesting. I will have a look at what it has to say and I will let you know if I have any further queries on any of the points raised therein.

What can you tell me about the length of time that water can be kept in good condition if it is trapped during the monsoon season?

Thank you, as always, for your informative words.

On the face of it, I guess that Biwater IS far better than P. Water. However, in practice…….

BP should obviously have been prosecuted years ago for exploitation of insects.

Best Wishes.

The one and only J.
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Sat, 9 Jul 2005, 16:24 – Grant (World of Water)
PART TWO … to the one and only J

I promote every householder to have a water butt and visually, I like old wine barrels but have seen many different containers. People must use what they have to hand in their locally.

Elevated water storage tanks allows distribution by gravity so keeping down pumping costs.

Underground storage facilitates better insulation thus warm monsoon rains can also be a useful heat sump.

Whether water comes from a natural aquifer or an underground tank, boil it and test it if you are uncertain about its quality . Each site is unique

Are there any detailed descriptions available anywhere on those currently in use in Kenya and Uganda? If not, you might consider including some information and illustrations at www.thehobb.tv

That simple information might enable a lot of people to launch projects in their own villages around the world.

Then there will be the necessity to decide on the positioning of the tank, with respect to the area which it will serve, and the method of delivery of the water to that area. Will it be necessary for the tank to be situated at a higher level? Has the whole story not been documented by any eco-friendly water engineer? Again, I am sure that I could sort out a satisfactory arrangement, but it might not be the most efficient.

Acid Rain is probably not a threat.

The following Web Site : http://www.rainwaterharvesting.org may help.

All best

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Grant
World of Water
World Clean Water Campaigner

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Sat, 9 Jul 2005, 13:15 – Grant (World of Water)
To the one and only J

Biwater is far better than P.Water surely (however you try and spell it. I often wondered how BP worked till my dad told me it was not a by-product of the honey industry.

I attended a talk on “Wind Power” last night – another concept that whilst logical and in its simple form and most attractive on wind full days, has been taken to an extreme. For simple farm use to pump ‘top-up’ water etc. it is fine. Turning wind into electricity is a move too far, like turning peat into heat.

Rain is rain. Useful in its original supply form and Nature given.

On plan, Circular. In 3D, these tanks are as you say, most CYLINDRICAL. Strange that on side elevation they appear as rectangles or squares. Ahhh the wonder of geometry (or maths!).

Using a funnel-shaped collector for a rain gauge might look fine but a plain sloping roof collects more.

Some more thoughts from me .. later.

All best

<*)))))))><

Grant
World of Water
World Clean Water Campaigner

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Wed, 6 Jul 2005, 11:58 – John C. Jones To Grant (World of Water)

Once again, many thanks for the wise words.

I will focus my mind on further news from Biwater. (What? BUY water?) Even the name is not very encouraging. (I wonder who THEIR business adviser was. The name P. Brain springs to mind.) Nevertheless, I will do my best to act as a magnet for their reports to “World of Water”.

The concepts of damming, towing glaciers etc. seem so unnatural that simple logic is enough to tell us that they do not provide the solution. “Robbing Peter to pay Paul” can surely never be sustainable. Your rejection of those ideas has my full support.

Optimal use of rainwater definitely appears to be the ONLY natural solution. I cannot see that it can reasonably be opposed. Surely Nature’s own “solution” to what is a natural “problem” (i.e. the need for water) can NEVER be improved upon. Even the harmless nomad could see that the equation didn’t need further tweaking in order to balance it. Why remove anything from anywhere? (Money rears its ugly head once more!)

So far, so good — we’ve boiled it down to rainwater. (That didn’t take long, did it?)

On the question of tanking, I must ask for clarification of your suggestion, only because of the terminology (circular) which you have used. I suspect that you might mean CYLINDRICAL tanks, but I have a feeling that SPHERICAL tanks would, by the same reasoning, be the best of all. Which type shall we go for? I am sure that it will not overtax your brain to decide on that one.

I will want to use the most EFFICIENT method of collecting and storing the water. I never take anything for granted, Grant. There MUST be a best way. Obviously, even I could manage to arrange something that would suffice, but it might not be the VERY BEST method. The rain can easily be caught in large containers (maybe funnel-shaped?). From there it can easily be transferred to an underground tank. One of these per household (approximately) will probably be best, will it not? The tank must obviously be small enough to be “manageable” as far as transportation is concerned. What will be the best material to use for making them?

There will definitely be a MOST EFFICIENT METHOD of doing all this. There will also be an optimal distance underground for the exact location of the tank, perhaps. For how long will the water remain in good condition in such an underground tank? Those questions must be answered before I can proceed. Are there any detailed descriptions available anywhere on those currently in use in Kenya and Uganda?

That simple information might enable a lot of people to launch projects in their own villages around the world.

Then there will be the necessity to decide on the positioning of the tank, with respect to the area which it will serve, and the method of delivery of the water to that area. Will it be necessary for the tank to be situated at a higher level? Has the whole story not been documented by any eco-friendly water engineer? Again, I am sure that I could sort out a satisfactory arrangement, but it might not be the most efficient.

(Someone on the radio has just said that a lot of Ugandans do have a problem with accessing clean water.)

With reference to your final sentence, “If the village you wish to supply a Water Scheme to is in an area without Rain then get back to me for more traditional ways forward.”, I must repeat that the area in question is PERFECTLY LOCATED. For this reason I am confident that this plan will actually be implemented in the not-too-distant future. It is most important, in fact, that you understand what a FANTASTIC water-supply I will have at my disposal AT TIMES.

Everyone has HEARD of “the monsoon” but not many people from these parts have actually EXPERIENCED it. (The travel companies deliberately avoid taking holidaymakers there during that time of the year.) Sometimes it absolutely pours it down NON-STOP for ten to fifteen days! For those of us who love water, it is fantastic. I have read that Assam, which is not far away from “my place”, has the heaviest rainfall per year in the world. That is why it produces such fine tea, they say.

The monsoon season lasts for about two or three months and, at a guess, I reckon that it provides enough water to keep the area supplied for the whole year. Does that sound feasible to you? Will I be able to collect that water and use it over a period of a year, supplemented by the odd shower now and then? I might have to use some of those “traditional” methods which you mention in order to top up the supply, but maybe not.

Does the concept of Acid Rain come into the equation?

This message is only the beginning of what could prove to be a worldwide project. Please add your views as soon as you have a spare moment.

Thanks, as always, for your keen interest in this very important matter.

Best Wishes.

The one and only J.
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Sat, 2 Jul 2005, 15:07 – Grant (World of Water)

Biwater replied saying they would keep “World of Water” updated so we will await the news and drip feed our wish for such information.

Forget the “Ownership of Water” problems associated with pumping, Dams, Riparian Rights and glaciers!

I am not a devotee of reducing the levels of aquifers even further or towing icebergs around the world. Rain is my personal favourite and there are many fine examples of village communities harnessing all they require from the ‘gifts from above even in Kenya and Uganda.

Collecting, storing and using rainwater is a very personal thing and there are many ways to do this but circular (stronger) underground tanking is the best.

Removing water from lakes and rivers can create problems for other water-life forms.

Desalination using sun energy can create a rather sub-pure product.

Whenever “World of Water” is approached, there is a ‘best’ solution to achieve access to the best solution, water.

If the village you wish to supply a Water Scheme to is in an area without Rain then get back to me for more traditional ways forward.

My best wishes

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Grant
World of Water
World Clean Water Campaigner
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Wed, 29 Jun 2005, 16:33 – John C. Jones

It was pleasing to see the words “WATER-SUPPLIES WORLDWIDE” on the screen as soon as I reached Grant’s own HoBBblog site recently at www.thehobb.tv

If someone were to arrive here now with a request to come and sort out his village’s water-supply in an under-developed distant land, how would I set about doing it? What advice can you give to someone who wants to actually go and do it somewhere?

As I am a firm believer in actually DOING something, can any of you provide me with enough information to provide a new water-supply system for any village or town which seems perfectly located in the Himalayas?

What exactly is the difficulty which prevents other people from going and doing such things?

What exactly is everyone waiting for? Or do you have enough projects running already.

By the way, Grant, did you have any luck with the Biwater e-mail? I also sent a message to one of the water companies ages ago and, similarly, they didn’t bother to reply.

We are at least getting somewhere this time.

Best Wishes.

The one and only J.

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Tue, 14 Jun 2005, 11:58 – John C. Jones To Grant (World of Water)

Hello again Grant.

On the subject of Global Warming, it has been said that, before long, the U.K. will witness a proliferation of BEECH TREES, KIWI FRUIT and PISTACHIOS. When you have a spare moment, perhaps you would be so kind as to give us all your valued opinion on this claim. Should we commence planting these items as soon a possible, or would you suggest an alternative business strategy?

Best Wishes.

The one and only J. Water)